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United Kingdom

CONDITIONS FOUND IN CATS

cat in park

 

Diabetes Mellitus >>

Just as in humans, our pets can have Type I or Type II diabetes. Diabetes is a disease that affects the body’s ability to convert glucose into energy.

 

Feline Chlamydiosis >>

Feline chlamydiosis is an infection of the eyes caused by the bacterium Chlamydophila felis (formerly Chlamydia psittaci). It is a disease that affects cats worldwide.

 

Feline Flu >>

The two main causes are Feline Herpesvirus (FHV) and Feline Calicivirus (FCV). They are both widespread across the world. They not only affect domestic cats, but also other members of the cat family.

 

Feline Leukaemia Virus >>

Feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) is a virus that is found worldwide. Any cat may become infected by the virus, but the likelihood of infection varies greatly depending on the cat’s age, lifestyle, general health and environment.

 

Feline Panleucopenia >>

Feline Panleucopenia is caused by a parvovirus that is very resistant in the environment. The virus is different to the canine parvovirus. Young, non-vaccinated cats are the most susceptible.

 

Fleas & Ticks >>

Cats are at risk of infection and infestation of many types of parasites. You can see some of them, like fleas and ticks, but others may be hidden, like intestinal worms or heartworms.

 

Gastrointestinal foreign bodies >>

Dogs and cats may ingest an object that can pass down the oesophagus but is unable to pass out of the stomach or along the intestine (guts). This is known as a gastrointestinal foreign body.

 

Rabies >>

Rabies is a serious viral illness that can affect any warm blooded animal. Infection is usually by a bite from an infected animal. The virus causes inflammation of the brain (acute encephalitis).

 

Skin infections in Cats >>

Skin disease in cats can be caused by a number of conditions, ranging from trauma and bite wounds to parasites (including fleas, ringworm and mange) or bacterial infections secondary to underlying allergies (flea bites, inhalant/contact allergens, food allergies).

 

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