United Kingdom

Current State Of Disease

Prevalence of osteoarthritis (OA) in dogs is believed to be greater than 20%1 and growing as dogs live longer and obesity is becoming more of an issue. It is likely that 2 out of every 5 dogs in your practice have clinical signs of OA2.

OA is caused by many factors, including developmental issues, injury and obesity. Poor conformation often leads to OA early in life. Conformational changes impact both large (hip dysplasia) and small dogs (patellar luxations). So, both large and small dogs should be screened for OA. Dogs can show signs of pain due to OA much earlier than often recognised. Signs of OA may often be missed by pet owners as dogs hide signs of pain.

There is no cure for OA, however, early diagnosis and a multimodal management plan, including pain control, can help keep dogs active, manage weight, and support the quality of life of dogs with OA.

The content and tools on this site will provide veterinarians and veterinary nurses the latest on the Science of OA as well as resources to identify and treat dogs suffering from the pain of OA.




The New Science of Osteoarthritis (OA) Pain and Inflammation


Osteoarthritis continues to be a significant disease for humans and dogs alike. The lack of therapeutics based on new targets to help manage the pain associated with osteoarthritis has been a gap for over 20 years in both the human and veterinary professions but we are now on the verge of a new era in managing pain associated with OA in dogs with promising new class of products on the horizon. Find out more in this comprehensive Technical Bulletin written by B. Duncan X. Lascelles, BSc, BVSc, PhD, FRCVS, CertVA, DSAS(ST), DECVS, DACVS et al.






Screen for Canine Osteoarthritis Pain


Ross Palmer, DVM, MS, DACVS describes how he talks with dog owners to get a good chronic pain history from them:


“Oftentimes they are discussing certain behaviors that they see, certain impairments in the dog's mobility. And then sometimes, actually, in the context just of that discussion... And this is ideal, is when they'll actually ask me, “Do you think he's in pain?” That's wonderful, because that opens up the door.”







Osteoarthritis Checklist for Dog Owners







References



1. Johnston SA. Vet Clin North Amer. 1997;27(4)699-723

2. Study Report No. ORCAD1030, Zoetis Inc.

MM-05890

STAY INFORMED

Get notified when new resources are added.




Webinars

How to Recognise and Assess Canine OA?

Effective OA Management Look Like for Small Breed Dogs

Detecting and Measuring OA Pain in Young Dogs

Other Resources

The Canine Arthritis Management group is a syndicate of various individuals (specialists/GPS/nurse, etc.) focused on addressing the challenges of canine OA.







Other Resources

The Canine Arthritis Management group is a syndicate of various individuals (specialists/GPS/nurse, etc.) focused on addressing the challenges of canine OA.

1. Johnston SA. Vet Clin North Amer. 1997;27(4)699-723

2. Study Report No. ORCAD1030, Zoetis Inc.

MM-05007